Mystery photo of unknown gentleman possibly solved?

Recently, after a discussion with a cousin, I had cause to revisit an old mystery photo from New Zealand.
This discussion jogged my memory of an email I had received in June 2015 after a query to the Alexander Turnbull Library about the photo.
Fancy forgetting about it for that long.
My only excuse is that life got in the way.
The above photo in my possession is courtesy of Brigid Simpson and the Lavin family collection of my great grand uncle, Alexander MORGANin New Zealand.  Photo labeled “Unknown taken in Wellington”.
We have no idea of what connection these men had with Alexander Morgan whose family were all Roman Catholic.
Fiona Gray, research librarian at Alexander Turnbull Library would possibly date the photograph to c1890s.  Fiona kindly suggested the two outside gentlemen in the above photo were Rev James Gibb and Rev James Paterson
Portrait of Reverend James Gibb. S P Andrew Ltd :Portrait negatives. Ref: 1/1-013980-G. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. /records/23228151  http://natlib.govt.nz/records/23228151

Gibb, James (Rev Dr), 1857-1935
Presbyterian clergyman, political lobbyist. Presbyterian minister and Moderator. Wife, Jeannie Gibb (nee Jane Paterson Smith; married 1881 at Aberdeen; known as Jean in New Zealand). See DNZB (Vol 2, 1870-1900, p165-167) – http://natlib.govt.nz/items/22387441

I found this Creative Commons Image which I believe may well be the middle gentleman in the original photo.  Right side image of Rev George Thomas Marshall is from
http://nzetc.victoria.ac.nz/tm/scholarly/Cyc02Cycl-fig-Cyc02Cycl0672a.html
THE REV. GEORGE THOMAS MARSHALL, Wesleyan Minister in charge of the Franklin Circuit, resides at Pukekohe. He was born at Leamington, England, in 1853, and held a position as book-keeper and cashier to a firm of English merchants, until he left for New Zealand, in which he arrived in January, 1881, by the ship “Loch Urr.” Before coming to the colony Mr. Marshall was a local preacher in connection with the Wesleyan Church, and became a candidate for the ministry in 1882. He was for one year at the Three King’s Institute, as a student at his own expense, and for a second year by direction of the Conference. Mr. Marshall has been engaged in the work as a minister since 1883, when he was appointed to the PAGE 672 Upper Thames circuit. Subsequently he was at Kawakawa, Northern Wairoa, Paparoa, Tauranga, and Opunake respectively, and was afterwards at Richmond for four years. He was stationed at Pukekohe in April, 1899. Mr. Marshall was married, in 1887, to a daughter of the late Mr. W. P. Brown, a very old settler in the Bay of Islands, and has four sons and three daughters.
Photo of Rev James Paterson at right is courtesy of Fiona Gray, research librarian, Alexander Turnbull Library, National Library of New Zealand http://www.natlib.govt.nz/

As yet I haven’t found further information on Rev Paterson.
There seems to be another.  Image can be seen at https://digitalnz.org/records/1541403/fig-238rev-james-paterson-presbyterian-minister-1869 but his photo seems too different.

Two men front centre are Rev Gibb and Paterson 1933.
Do you think the mystery men have been found?
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Kiely family of Edi Upper

My Mum’s paternal grand-aunt Amelia Agnes “Millie” HART married Edmund Wills (or Wells) KIELY in Victoria in 1901.

Millie was born in 1879 at Echuca, the sister of my Mum’s grandmother, Margaret HART.  They were daughters of Peter HART, originally from Huntingdonshire, England, and Agnes MASON.

Millie and Edmund KIELY had 7 children all born in the Wangaratta region, Victoria where they farmed for many years.

One of the boys in 1912 swallowed strychnine and luckily survived.

Edmund Kiely died in 1935.
Millie KIELY nee HART died in 1971 at the grand age of 92 years.
Longevity seems to run in the family as Mum’s grandmother also lived to her 90s as did many of the HART sisters.

Knight family Wiltshire to Australia 1842

Update to my post of 29 September about My first foray into DNA for genealogy
When Karen told me she hadn’t been able to find Martha KNIGHT’s arrival in Australia I began searching.  According to her newspaper obituaries Martha’s sister, my great-great-grandmother, Ann Jane KNIGHT, was said to have arrived in Australia in 1847 from Gloucestershire.  I don’t know who supplied the information.
According to information given to Karen by other family members, the family came from Trowbridge in Wiltshire.
The DNA matches of we four KNIGHT descendants do agree with these findings.
In the 1841 census, John KNIGHT was a weaver living with his family at Melksham, Trowbridge.
John had married Ann LUCAS on April 8, 1824, in Trowbridge, Wiltshire.
The Knight family, consisting of father John, mother Ann and daughters Sarah, Jane (my Ann Jane), Martha and Ruth arrived in Tasmania on the ship Orleana in 1842.
Ruth went into domestic service for George MacLean who was the Deputy Commissary General for Hobart.
John went to work for a W Wilson of Davey Street.
The PINCHEN family also arrived on the Orleana.
In 1846 Ruth married William PINCHEN.
They had five children born between 1849 and 1859 in Geelong, Victoria.
William 1849, Charles 1850, Jane 1853, Ellen 1855 and Elizabeth 1859.
William must have had health problems as there was the following notice in the Star newspaper of Ballarat in September 1857.
Ruth didn’t stay with William though as records show in 1862 she had her first of six children with John TEASDALE.
Florence born 1862 at Creswick, Victoria.
John Knight born 1864 at Spring Creek, Victoria.
Ruth born 1866 at Happy Valley.
Wallace born 1866 at Happy Valley.
Lucas born 1869 at Linton.
Alice Maud born 1871 Spring Creek.
Ruth PINCHEN married John TEASDALE in 1883.
Ruth died in 1915; death Registration Number 12228
On the 9th of September 1852 in Geelong, Martha KNIGHT married James WHITE.
Witnesses were William and Ruth PINCHEN.
Martha and James had two children, Elizabeth Ann born 6 September 1853 at Ballarat, Victoria and James William born 11 September 1855 at Ballarat East.
On the 6th of September 1863 at Geelong Martha married Henry Phillip MARETT.
They had nine children at Ballarat.
Esther Zitella – 1858
Henry Phillip – 1860
Alfred Thomas – 1861
Jane Amelia  –  1864
Sophia Julia  – 1866
Martha Letitia – 1868
Selena Janvin – 1871
Emily Maude – 1872
Francis James – 1875
Martha’s husband, Henry Phillip MARETT died at Leederville, Western Australia on the 6th February 1905.
Martha died on the 9th of December 1907 at Caulfield, Victoria.
I have yet to find deaths for John KNIGHT and his wife Ann nee LUCAS.

Peter Webster MASON

A further confirmation of the details and death of my 3rd great-grandfather, Peter Webster MASON, was found this week by his great-great-grandson Steve Wakely.
Thanks Steve.

(1892, April 4). The Bendigo Independent (Vic. : 1891 – 1918), p. 2. from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article174510836

A nasty experience for young Elizabeth Mason of Myer’s Creek

Elizabeth MASON was born about 1845 in Cupar, Fife, Scotland.
She was the second eldest daughter of my 3rd great grandparents, Peter Webster MASON and Margaret Leslie nee CARSTAIRS.
Peter and Margaret Mason sailed from Plymouth, UK aboard  the “Cheapside”  on the 21st of May 1848. They reached Port Phillip on the 18th of August as assisted immigrants with children Andrew aged 2 and Susan aged 3 months.
Elizabeth did not come to Australia with her parents because she was sick in 1848.  She arrived on the “Ebba Brahe” on 8 Dec 1857 as a Governess.
Peter and Margaret’s next 8 children were born in Victoria.  One being my great great grandmother, Agnes MASON.
Not long after her arrival as a young teenager, poor Elizabeth had a rather nasty experience.

EAGLEHAWK POLICE COURT. (1858, November 23).
Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 2.,
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87985087
Transcription:
Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), Tuesday 23 November 1858, page 2

EAGLEHAWK POLICE COURT.

Monday, 22nd November, 1858.

(Before Messrs. L McLachlan, P.M., and

J. Ganley, J.P.)

THE EFFECTS OF THE BOTTLE-John Williams, who has been detained for some time on remand, having been suffering from delirium tremens, the result of his excesses, was cautioned and discharged.

CRIMINAL ASSAULT.- Duncan Robinson, alias McCullum, was brought up on remand charged with feloniously and criminally assaulting one Elizabeth Mason, at Myers’ Flat, on the 17th instant.

Mr. O’Loughlin appeared for the defence. The Court having been cleared,

Elizabeth Mason who is a rather good-looking-girl of about fourteen years of age, but with a peculiar look of slyness and cunning in her physiognomy-deposed that she was the daughter of Peter Mason, a dairyman at Myers’ Creek. Knows the prisoner; on Wednesday morning last, between nine and ten o’clock, prosecutrix was selling milk at Pegleg Gully; was at the tent of a man named Henry, who is living with, or is the husband of Christina Robinson (the sister of the prisoner). The prisoner and another man were sitting in the tent at the time. On leaving, the woman told her to call back at dinner-time for the money. On leaving and going to Sailor’s Gully, there was no one with her. On returning from Sailor’s Gully, between 11 and 12 o’clock, the prosecutrix again called at the tent of the prisoner’s sister to get payment for the milk, she had sold her in the morning. On looking into the tent, she saw the woman lying on the floor. Saw the prisoner come round the corner of the tent, told prosecutrix to go inside the tent, which she refused to do. There was another man with the prisoner.

[The husband of a female witness was found to be tampering with the witness, and endeavoring to drive her off by threats. He was immediately consigned to the logs.]

Prosecutrix then went away towards home. The prisoner came after her and said, ” Come here; I want to speak to you.” Prosecutrix then ran away. The prisoner followed, and caught her about half way between the tent and the schoolhouse. He seized hold of the prosecutrix, who pushed him, and he fell over a stone. The prisoner again got up and followed the prosecutrix, and laid hold of her again. Witness screamed and said to prisoner that she would tell Henry. Prisoner said, ” Will you tell lies upon me:” Prosecutrix was thrown down on her knees. She screamed “Murder,” and said, ” I’ll tell my father.” Prisoner threatened to kill her ” if she told any more lies on him to her father.” She then pushed him off and ran away. After running some distance, the prisoner caught her and stopped her, and prevented her from going into the school-house by saying that he would take her home. Prosecutrix again screamed “Murder!” she called out also, “Mrs. Enright,” and the woman came and drove the prisoner off. She said to him, “What are you doing to the girl ?” Prisoner said “I am driving her home to her father.” Mrs. Enright said to him. .’ Go away, or I’ll break your head ! ” Mr. Enright then took the witness to the tent of a woman named Marshall, and afterwards went to Mrs. Enright’s tent. The prosecutrix, after waiting a few minutes, left for home, and on her road, about half way home, on a bush road, met the prisoner, and another man (John Hunt). The prosecutrix endeavored to reach a tent belonging to Mrs. Richter; the prisoner ran after her, Hunt being left behind; the prosecutrix then picked up a large stone and ran away, the prisoner following; overtook her, and pulled her bonnet or hat off, breaking the ties in doing so; he then seized her, drew the shawl which she was wearing over her head, struck her, and kicked her; she then fell on the ground. [The remainder of the evidence, which is unfit for publication, fully substantiated the capital charge.] Immediately on arriving at home she informed her mother and father of what had occurred.

In answer to the questions of Mr. O’Loughlin she stated that she had on one occasion run away from home, and gone to Barker’s Creek ; that was about three months since ; her friends found her at a public-house. Nothing of any further consequence was elicited.

By the Bench : When she went to Barker’s Creek, she went alone ; she took with her 10s., which she took from a shelf; she went to the Barker’s Creek Hotel to nurse the baby at 10s. per week ; on the second night her mother came for her, and she returned with her; why she left her father’s house was because her father had threatened to beat her for “something.” [After a great deal of pressing and threatening with the pains of’ imprisonment for contumely, the witness admitted that the ” something” was telling lies.] She had been in the colony about a twelvemonth; she came from Cupar, in Fifeshire.

Mary Enright, a widow, residing in Dead Horse Flat, deposed that on the day referred to she saw the prisoner and the prosecutrix together near the road in Pegleg Gully; heard the prisoner say to the girl, ” go on;” heard the girl give the prisoner a stiff answer ; witness gave the prisoner a blowing up. After a long course of malingering, fencing, and prevarication, the threat from the Bench of twenty-four hours imprisonment, brought her to her senses, and she further deposed to a conversation with the prisoner, in which she asked what was he doing with the girl? He said that was nothing to the witness. She said that he should not use the girl so, and chucked a stone at the prisoner, because she saw him handling the girl; witness took the girl home and gave her a drink; she was not crying.

Maria Falcon Egan deposed that she knew the prisoner and the prosecutrix; on Wednesday she heard the cries of a girl in the bush, it was a cry of lamentation, not of murder, and afterwards saw a man pushing the prosecutrix about; she could not with certainty identify the prisoner as that man ; she eventually swore to the prisoner as being the man; the girl came down about five minutes afterwards with Mrs. Enright; the girl had been crying; told witness that a man had been pulling her through the bush, and had asked her to go home with him; a little girl, named Dolly Wright, came and told the prosecutrix that two men were watching for her; Mrs. Enright promised to see the girl safe home, and prosecutrix and she went together.

The case was at this stage remanded till Thursday, for the production of the witness Dolly Wright.

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87987592
Transcription:
Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), Friday 26 November 1858, page 3

EAGLEHAWK POLICE COURT.

Thursday, 25th November, 1858.

(Before Mr. L. M’Lachlan, P.M.)

DRUNKENNESS.—Two persons were fined five shillings each on this charge ; and another, who pleaded that the heat of the weather on Monday last had made his head bad, was fined one shilling.

RAPE —Duncan Robertson, who had been remanded from Monday on a charge of criminally assaulting Elizabeth Mason, was again brought up. Mr. O’Loughlin defended the prisoner. The following additional evidence for the prosecution was taken,

Janet Ann Wright, a little girl ten years of age, deposed that on a day last week (witness could not recollect distinctly which day) she was near Mrs. Falcon Egan’s house, in Pegleg Gully, when she saw the prisoner chasing the prosecutrix amongst the bushes, and push her down. She saw Mrs. Enwright (another witness) take up a stone, and throwing it at him tell him to let the girl alone. He answered that she had nothing to do with the girl.

Eleanor Marshall deposed that she was in her own tent with Mrs. Egan 0n Wednesday week last, when hearing an unusual noise outside the tent they went to the door, and saw the prisoner darting past through the bushes. Shortly afterwards Mrs. Enwright and the prosecutrix came into the tent. She appeared as if she had been crying.

Margaret Mason, the mother of the prosecutrix, deposed that she left the house on the morning of Wednesday week last, shortly after six o’clock, to go to Pegleg Gully with some milk, which she was in the habit of taking round to the customers. When she returned, about twelve o’clock, sha was greatly agitated and crying. From information which her daughter communicated to her, witness examined prosecutrix, and found indications of her having been violently abused. She did not take her to a medical man that day.

Dr. Sorley deposed that ho examined the prosecutrix on Thursday, tho 18th inst., but found no particular marks of violence. The prosecutrix had arrived at the age of womanhood six months since. He was of opinion that the chastity of the prosecutrix had been violated previously, There were no indications of recent violence.

Senior Constable A’Hern, stationed at Myer’s Flat, stated that when he took the prisoner into custody, at Fletcher’s Creek, he resisted in a violent manner, and it was only with the assistance of another constable that ha was secured and conveyed in a spring-cart to Myer’s Flat Police Station.

The prisoner, who reserved his defence, was committed for trial at the next Circuit Court.

CIRCUIT COURT. (1859, March 11).
Bendigo Advertiser (Vic. : 1855 – 1918), p. 3.,
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article87987592
Transcription:
RAPE.
Duncan Robinson was informed against for having criminally assaulted Elizabeth Mason, on the 17th November.

Mr. O’Loughlin appeared for the prisoner.

The counsel for the Crown, in opening the case, said that they had been unable to obtain the presence of one of the witnesses for the prosecution (Mrs. Enwrigbt.) They had subpoenaed her, but she could not be found. After stating the case, he called Elizabeth Mason, the prosecutrix, a girl about 14 years of age, who deposed that she lived with her father at Myers Creek, who was a dairyman.
On the day mentioned in her information she went to the tent of a Mrs. Henry, where the prisoner’s
sister stopped. When she returned to Mrs. Henry’s, about twelve o’clock, to get paid for the milk she had left in the morning, and was leaving, the prisoner came round from the back, and after
asking her to go inside the tent, and on her refusing he followed her. She walked away fast, and he overtook her and laid his hand on her shoulder.

She told him to let her alone, or she would tell his brother-in-law. He threatened to knock her head off if she did. He would not let her go, and she gave him a knock and pushed him away, when he fell. She ran away, and prisoner ran after her, and again overtook her. She called out to a Mrs. Enwright, whom she saw. and she coming up, took up a stone, and throwing it at prisoner, told him to let her (prosecutrix)
alone. She went to Mrs. Enwright’s tent, and after staying about ten minutes she left, and again saw the prisoner, who again ran after her, and overtaking her committed the criminal assault upon her. This was in a place between her father’s place and Dead Horse Flat.

By His Honor : No one had ever used her in a similar manner before this occurrence.

Cross-examined by Mr. O’Loughlin : A man named John Hunt was with prisoner when she met him the second time. [The prosecutrix was submitted to a searching cross-examination, in order to show compliance on her part, which she, however, denied.] She had once ran away from home, and gone to Barker’s Creek. She did so because her father threatened to beat her. It was not for telling lies.

The depositions of the prosecutrix were read, but did not show any very material discrepancy with her present testimony, except that on that occasion she stated to the Bench that her father had threatened to beat her for telling lies, which was the cause of her running away.

His Honor remarked that the depositions were taken in the most careless manner possible, as were all that came before him In that Court.

There was no telling by them what a witness did say.

By a Juror: She did not leave her father’s house four months ago, and take shelter in a farm house near Bullock Creek.

The Juror wished a witness sent for, who would prove that she was not telling the truth in this instance. The witness was accordingly sent for.

Mary Falcon Egan deposed that she saw the prisoner running after, the girl and knock her down amongst the bushes. She was standing at her tent door

By Mr. O’Louglilin: She had never seen the prisoner before that occasion. She was rather short-sighted, but she had a glass which she used on that occasion.

Janet Ann Wright, a girl ten years of age, who was with the prosecutrix when they first met the prisoner, stated she saw him chasing prosecutrix through tile bushes. She saw Mrs. Enwright throw a stone at prisoner for running after the prosecutrix.

Margaret Mason, the mother of the girl, deposed to having examined the prosecutrix, in consequence of a complaint she made on her return home, and finding indications of her having been treated with great violence.

Dr. Sorley, of Eaglehawk, who examined the girl on the 18th of November last, gave medical testimony to the effect that if the criminal assault had been committed, it was not accompanied with violence. With a girl of that age, the assault might have been committed without leaving any traces of violence.

James Shine (the witness spoken of by the juror), was called, and, on the prosecutrix appearing, he stated that he believed the girl, whom himself and wife had sheltered about four months ago at Bullock Creek, wa3 tho same. He could not, however, swear to it. She stated then that her name was Mason, and that her father kept cows, and lived at Myer’s Creek. They sheltered her for a week.

The prosecutrix, in answer to His Honor, denied ever having seen the witness.

This was the case for the prosecution.

Mr. O’Loughlin having addressed the jury for the defence, called John Hunt (at present under sentence for a robbery committed in company with the prisoner on the same day as that on which the present alleged offence was committed), deposed that when they met the prosecutrix, prisoner, after enquiring of her if she was going home, asked her to give him a kiss, but added, that he supposed she would be telling her father. She replied, that
there was no b-y fear; she was not that b-y flat. He was in company with prisoner all day, and saw nothing of the offence sworn to.

The Crown Prosecutor replied at considerable length; and His Honor having summed up, the jury, after an absence of about twenty minutes, returned a verdict of guilty.

Sentence of death was recorded; His Honor stating that, while his life would be spared, he would confer with the Executive Government, as to the amount of punishment his crime should receive.

Stay tuned for the rest of Elizabeth’s story to be told by her great-grandson, Steve Wakely who has done extensive research and shared many family stories.

My first foray into DNA for genealogy

I have recently had an autosomal DNA test done by FTDNA.
I was so excited when my results came back the other day.
What a huge learning curve!
I uploaded the raw DNA data to GEDmatch and waited for those results to come through.
Once they had, the third highest match shown in my results was a known third cousin with whom I have done a lot of family research.
The top two and the fifth highest DNA matches to me in my GEDmatch results indicated fairly close relationships.
The fifth match was Karen who contacted me saying she believed she would be a third cousin once removed and the other two would be third cousins.
It turned out they are descendants of a John KNIGHT as am I.
My maternal great-great-grandmother, Anne Jane KNIGHT was born about 1832. She married William Finlay FLEMING in Melbourne in 1852.
They went on to have thirteen children, the fifth being my great grandfather, Donald FLEMING.
Ann Jane died aged 88 years on the 10th of November 1920 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Matilda WORRALL.
One of the newspaper obituaries for our Ann Jane FLEMING states she was born in Gloucestershire and arrived in Australia with her parents in 1847.
Another stated she arrived in 1847 with her parents and 2 sisters, since deceased.
The birthplace on her death certificate is only recorded as England, the informant was her son John Knight Fleming.
It looks like she may have actually come from Trowbridge in Wiltshire which is roughly only 30 to 50 miles south of Gloucestershire.
The 1841 census has a Knight family, John, a weaver, age 40, his wife Ann age 40 and their daughters, Ruth age 13 (b 1828), Sarah age 11 (b 1830), Jane age 8 (b 1833) and Martha age 6 (b1835) living at Timbrell Street, Trowbridge in Wiltshire.
Karen is a descendant of Martha KNIGHT.
In her email, Karen says “If Martha is indeed the sister of Ann Jane, which the DNA suggests, there’s still some mystery. I’ve never found when Martha arrived in Australia, the earliest record of her here that I have found is her marriage to a James White in Geelong in 1852. 
A William Pinchen (one of the witnesses) married a Ruth Knight … which fits with records I currently have as Ruth being one of Martha’s sisters.
Other cousins visited Trowbridge in Wiltshire a few years ago and tracked down details of Martha, her parents, and siblings.
HOWEVER … Martha is a bit of a mystery … on various birth certificates for her children she gives her name as Martha Lane / Lain / Knight … and usually from Trowbridge, Wiltshire. I’ve never found any record of her marrying her partner / my ancestor Henry Philip Marett.
Our Ann Jane named daughters Ruth and Sarah.
I have repeatedly searched passenger lists etc for the Knight family with no luck.
There is a marriage in Trowbridge 8 April 1824 for a John KNIGHT and an Ann LUCAS.

Private William John BEATON

William John BEATON was a first cousin of my maternal great-great-grandmother, Mary Ann PIKE (1847-1933).

He was born in Euroa, Victoria in 1877, first son, the third of ten children of Peter and Catherine BEATON.

William enlisted as a Private, service number 1912, on the 15th of January 1915.   He was 35 years of age, 5 foot 7 and a half inches tall, weighed 144 pounds, with a fair complexion, brown hair, and eyes.
His battalion embarked at Melbourne on the AT20 Hororata on the 17th of April 1915.

Troops boarding HMAT Hororata (A20) on gangway at far left.
Photo from Australian War Memorial
Item copyright: Copyright expired – public domain
Public Domain Mark This item is in the Public Domain
William was reported missing in action at the Gallipoli Peninsula on the 27th of August 1915.

A court of inquiry was later held at Serapeum in April 1916.
As a result, he was recorded as killed in action on the 27th of August 1915 following a report from a fellow soldier, Corporal HYLAND of Benalla.
Corporal HYLAND stated “on August 27th at Chocolate Hill we charged and as soon as we got out of the trench I saw BEATON fall short.  He did not move and I believe he was killed”.

Sadly, Peter and Catherine BEATON received a letter from the War Office stating “I regret very much that, notwithstanding the efforts of our Graves Services Unit, we have so far been unable to obtain any trace of the last resting place of your son the late No. 1912, Private W.J. BEATON, 14th Battalion…..”

William John BEATON is commemorated at the Lone Pine memorial.  Lest We Forget.

Private William Finlay FLEMING 1561

On his enlistment into the A.I.F on the 4th of August 1915, at Seymour, William Finlay FLEMING was aged 22 years and 1 month.

*above photos used with permission from then owner.

He was 5 foot 5 and a half inches tall and weighed 150 lbs.
His complexion was ruddy and eyes and hair brown.
William’s surname was spelt FLEMMING in some records.
Like his younger brother David Claude FLEMING, his religious denomination was Presbyterian.
William was the eldest son of Finlay FLEMING and Jessie nee SPLATT of King Valley.
Only 4 years before his enlistment he narrowly escaped severe injury in an accident that was reported in the local newspaper.
The North Eastern Despatch.  
Wednesday, March 22, 1911 – page 2
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A narrow escape – Wm Fleming aged 20, a son of Mrs. Finlay Fleming, King Valley, had a remarkably narrow escape from serious accident on Monday.  He was driving a draught horse attached by chains to a log, 8 feet long by about 2 feet in diameter, when the animal became fractious, and in an endeavour to regain control, Mr. Fleming fell.  The horse trod on his chest, but fortunately did not rest it’s full weight on him.  As the animal moved away, the leg grazed the side of Mr. Fleming’s body, making numerous bruises.  There was a good deal of internal bleeding and the sufferer was brought into D. Henderson, who found that his injuries were fortunately not serious.
further information at
William’s unit the 8th Light Horse Regiment, 12th Reinforcement embarked from Melbourne, Victoria, on board HMAT A11 Ascanius on 10 November 1915.

 

Troops on board HMAT Ascanius (A11), as it departs.  A small boat is seen in the left foreground.
Troops on board HMAT Ascanius (A11), as it departs. A small boat is seen in the left foreground.Item copyright: Copyright expired – public domain
Public Domain Mark This item is in the Public Domain

In December 1915 William reported for duty at Heliopolis.  In February 1916 they marched out to Serapeum and some other places they were recorded at were Port Said, Abasan, Tripoli and later Moascar which was a hospital camp.
I can’t find any mention of why he was there.
At one stage at Port Said William was reported for being “Out of Bounds” and deprived of 28 days pay.
In August 1917 he trained as a Gunner and passed in the Hotchkiss gun course.
William returned to Australia per PT Sydney on the 5th of March 1919 and was discharged on the 21st of March 1919.
He died at the age of 80 years on the 24th of April 1974 at Wangaratta.  It seems he didn’t marry.

Trooper David Alexander KING (AHKING)

David Alexander AHKING (surname later changed to KING) was born in 1895 at Wirrimbirchip (now known as Birchip) Victoria, Australia.
David was a first cousin of my great great grandmother, Margaret HART.

He was the tenth child and sixth son of Euphemia Margaret MASON (1859-1942) and Thomas AHKING.  Thomas was born in Canton, China in 1843.  He died at Maryborough in 1900. Euphemia is recorded as marrying Richard POPE in 1900. At the time of her mother’s remarriage, the youngest child Rachel AHKING was a ward of the state.  It is said that Richard Pope didn’t want a Chinese child in his house.

The older surviving children may have already left home and sadly David and his brother Edmund James were both killed in the war.

On his attestation paper of December 4, 1914, David named his older brother Arthur as next of kin.
Arthur’s address was recorded as Kellerberin, Doodlakine, Western Australia.
David enlisted at Culcairn, New South Wales on the 28th of November 1914 and was recorded as 22 years old, 5 foot 11 inches tall in one record and 5 foot 9 inches in another.  He weighed 160 lbs with a fair complexion, grey eyes, and light brown hair.

A timeline of David’s war service from the National Archives.
20 Feb 1915 embarked at Sydney per HMAT A21 Marere
18 July 1915 Sick with influenza
23 July 1915 Admitted to 1st A.C.C.S
27 July 1915 Admitted to NZ Hospital Port Said.
3 August 1915 Admitted to 1st A. StynHpl Mudros
13 August 1915 Admitted to 24th CCS Mudros
20 August 1915 Insubordination at Mudros.  72 hours detention
24 August 1915 Rejoined regiment ex-hospital.
3 October 1915 Pyrexia – adm 1st Aust Cas clearing stn to hosp
5 October 1915 admitted to 21st G Hpl Alexandria. Enteric.
12 October 1915. Reported sick to HPL
10 November 1915 Adm to enteric conv camp Port Said.
13 December 1915 Invalided to Aust for 3 months. change ex Suez.
13 December 1915 Sailed from Suez on Wandilla Arr Melb 1/4/1/16 (sic) enteric fever

4 April 1916 return to duty 2nd M.D
10 July 1916 Trans to Camel Corps ex 2nd L.H.T. Rgt
15 July 1916 Taken on strength No 11 Coy 1 Camel Corps.
25 July 1916 App T/Lance Cpl.
11 November 1916 Trans from 6th L.H. & T.O.S of 3rd Anzac Bn 1CB de (states T/L.Cpl)
13 December 1916 sick to Hpl. ex 1. C.C No 12 Coy
15 December 1916 Adm to 24th Styn Hpl. Disorders of Accommodation.
15 December 1916 Adm to 24th Stat Hpl.
17 December 1916 disc to duty
18 December 1916 reported for duty X Hpl

28 January 1917 Insolence to an NCO “In the Field”
4 Feb 1917 Deprived of 5 days pay (states 12th Coy I.C.C)
28 Feb 1917 Delay in obeying an order in the field
1 Mar 1917 Awarded 3 days F.R. No.2 (Pte)
19 April 1917 Reptd. “wounded in action” Near Gaza & to Hpl same date.
19 April 1917 Shell wd Lt shldr 4th fld Coy Amb
29 April 1917 Died of wounds GSW Chest at 2nd Aust Sty Hpl
29 April 1917 GSW Back & through lung.  Died at 2nd Aust Sty Hpl El Arish
Buried by W.A. Moore C.F. Chaplain

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Witnesses state that about 8 am on the 19th of April 1917 during the second Gaza Stunt (2nd Battle of Gaza) David King suffered dangerous gunshot wounds to the chest while at the front of enemy lines.  “He was well liked by all, jolly and cheery always”.

Several letters in 1920 and 1921 record the War office searching for Arthur King’s address regarding who is next of kin of David. Correspondence had been sent to the recorded address of Arthur being c/o Hedge’s Store, Koolberrin, via Bruce Rock, W.A.

1921-next-of-kin-query

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The Bruce Rock postmaster informed that his address was unknown, believed to have returned to Victoria.
The manager of Hedge’s Store later informed Base Records that Arthur King’s address was now Birchip, Victoria.
Nearest next of kin was to be established for the disbursement of David’s medals.

Eventually, David’s mother, Mrs. E Pope of Stawell made contact with the War Office and was granted his war gratuity and medals.

Private Ernest John (Ah KING) KING

The KING (AH KING) family are a challenge to research, even more so in recording the war service of the three youngest boys of Thomas AH KING and his wife; my great great grand aunt, Euphemia nee MASON.
Thomas AH KING who was born about 1843 in China had died in 1900 when Ernest was aged thirteen, Edmund eleven and David only five.  All eleven of the children’s births were registered with Thomas KING/AH KING as father.

I have previously written about the war service of the two youngest, Edward (Edmund) James  and David Alexander.
None of the boys listed their mother as next of kin on their attestation papers.

When their mother married Richard POPE (pretty quick) in 1900  it is said he didn’t want a chinese child in the house so their youngest sister, three year old Rachael, was “put on the State” (made a ward of the state).
She never got to know her family……. another story to come.

Richard POPE died in 1915 and Euphemia married Frederick ELLIS in 1920.

I haven’t yet found where the boys were living at the time but it seems likely they were with their eldest sister Margaret who had married William CLOVER in 1894.  Margaret died in 1914.

When researching Edmund and David I didn’t know that Ernest had also enlisted in the First A.I.F. until I found their mother’s death notice in the newspaper archives at Trove .

In the war service records there was only one Ernest KING born at Birchip.  He enlisted into the 14th Battalion on the 4th of November 1916.  He was later in the 29th Battalion.
His address was given as Holbrook, New South Wales, next of kin was first listed as a friend, Henry COLLYER also of Holbrook.  Later the next of kin was changed to cousin, Miss F HOWARD of Upper Edmonton, London.
It looks as though Ernest may have cut all ties with his mother and siblings.
He declared “I Ernest John KING have no occasion to make a will” and to me it looks like the words “Parents forgotten” crossed out.
On the 17th of November 1916 Ernest embarked from Sydney on the SS Port Napier.  By March 1917 he was in France.  In October that year he sustained severe gunshot wounds to the thigh and face and in November was sent to hospital in England where he spent some months recuperating.
April 1918 saw Ernest at the No 1 Command depot at Sutton Veny.
On the 10th of December 1918 after some further medical issues Ernest returned to Australia on the “Somali” and was discharged from the A.I.F in March 1919.
On looking for further records of Ernest I came across a Will in New South Wales which named his wife as Lydia Violet Thorburn. His occupation was farmer and grazier.
Ernest died on the 8th of January 1940.
Ernest and Lydia had married at Wagga Wagga, New South Wales in 1919.  They had 5 children.
In the electoral rolls Ernest’s address after the war was Coppabella near Holbrook, New South Wales.
 Interestingly Lydia had been married previously but her first husband turned out to be a bigamist.
From the 1919 New South Wales police gazettes I learned that a warrant was issued in Albury for the arrest of Private William LANE reg # 6887 of the same battalion as Ernest.  William was on active service abroad and was also from Holbrook.
He was being charged with bigamy as when he married Lydia at Holbrook in 1916 he had already been married in England, and was still, to an Ann GRIFFITHS of High Ercall in Shropshire.